Mindfulness and the Mindful Coach

At the end of this sentence stop and please close your eyes and focus on the next 5 breaths you slowly breathe in and out. If you did and truly focused on each breath, you experienced a moment of mindfulness. You may have noticed the brain attempting to chatter away but the volume was down so low because your total attention was looking at, feeling and experiencing 5 breaths. Nothing more. Nothing less. Join us as we dive deeper into understanding: what is mindfulness? What are its benefits? How can it help coaches be of greater service to their own growth and transformation that benefits themselves and their clients personally and professionally always and all ways?



As a coach if you continued to read on, you experienced what you wanted to do. Why did you do what you did? Why do people do what they do? The two reasons are: 1) because you/they are able; 2) because you/they can. Anything else is an explanation, rationalization, excuse masquerading as a fact.


If the reader didn’t observe the 5 breaths they now have an opportunity for a do-over. This may be more difficult because of judging the author or themselves. By focusing on those 5 breaths, really focusing on each inhalation and exhalation feelings, emotions, thoughts are identified as feelings, emotions, thoughts. Nothing more. Nothing less.


In a moment, the realization is I am breathing and observing. I feel the air in my nostrils. I sense the expansion of my entire chest area. I am not thinking because my brain is focused on the experience of breathing. No judgment, just observing. My inner chatterbox for a moment is quieted and is allowed to rest and just be present for that moment.


This comment summarizes what mindfulness is about: It’s not what you think. Are you able to look at some object and just look at it? No words just observe.


Are you able to listen, really listen with total attention because there’s no mind-chatter or holding what you are going to say? It’s interesting that hidden in the word “listen” is the word “silent.”


Jon Kabat-Zinn’s definition “Intentionally focusing attention on moment-to-moment experience without being swept up by judgments or preconceived ideas and expectations” pictures what those moments look like. No inner dialogue.


As a coach, our role is creating a relationship based on hearing what a client needs to hear based on trust and truth. The truth being the client is responsible for the life they are living and creating. The trust being they are capable of much better results than they are currently generating and they can generate their own better, more life-giving solutions


Mindfulness is a state of being non-judgmentally aware of one’s own experience moment-to-moment (Davis & Hayes, 2012). Mindfulness is “being in the moment.” A mindful coach practices and teaches “stop and smell the roses." Be present. Be present. Be present. Be aware. Be awake. Be here in this moment.


I have thoughts. I am not my thoughts. I have feelings. I am not my feelings. I have emotions. I am not my emotions. I have sensations. I am not my sensations. A difficult lesson to learn yet a life-making game changer.


That awareness of thought, emotion, perception, and overall experience are direct responses to a state of mindfulness. Research continues to uncover the many benefits of mindfulness for both coach and client.


Join us as we dive deeper into understanding: what is mindfulness? What are its benefits? How can it help coaches be of greater service to their own growth and transformation that benefits themselves and their clients personally and professionally always and all ways?


What is mindfulness?


“Intentionally focusing attention on moment-to-moment experience without being swept up by judgments or preconceived ideas and expectations.” — Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD Scientist, Author, Professor